odd walking thoughts

-a strangeness followed him deep into the woods. he wished it was fully dark. he wanted the thickness of its empty comfort. the moon however dispersed nighttime light onto every shadow. he sat on a stump and tried to watch his thoughts. “what do you do with your thoughts?” he asked a tree. the tree replied, “as soon as you have one, it is alive. it’s never again going to not be. you’ve born possible greatness. give your thoughts life and watch them be.”

-M. Taggart
copyright 2018

About-
https://mtaggartwriter.wordpress.com/m-taggart/

Odd Walking Thoughts

A boy stood in the middle of the woodland. Picking ticks from his legs, arms, and even his neck. He wished he had brought a lint roller, or alcohol to light his body with. The ticks mounted a heavy advance. He’d counted over fifty. And that was only the ticks he could see. The boy started to walk, then run, toward a pond. He sprinted downhill, the sun, blazing through the canopy of tree tops, started to dizzy him; his shadow caused too much chaos. Landing hard on the ground and letting go a grunt, which spurted spittle, the boy asked the nearby pond, ‘Is this happening?’ The pond was soundly sitting and awaiting the boys arrival. And finally the pond did respond, ‘Why are you here?’

Life in New England

New England teases us with history, landscape, and weather then grips our imagination -M. Taggart

Mapio.net Turners Bridge.jpg
Gill/Turners Falls, MA. Travel North on the Connecticut River just a few miles and you’ll find you’re in New Hampshire on one side, and Vermont on the other. In the middle of the river, it’s up to you. (photo credit mapio.net)

 

UMASS campus
UMASS campus. Amherst, Massachusetts. I know a number of my friends have witnessed the wind that whips by the library in the winter. (photo credit google images/hercampus.com)
Portland ME Harbor (visitmaine)
Portland Harbor, Maine. Portland is quickly becoming a destination. It’s rustic New England docks are being mixed with Brew Pubs and diversity. Go there and possibly take a harbor cruise all the way to Nova Scotia. (photo credit google images/visitmaine) 

 

 

Green River Bridge Greenfield
Green River Bridge. Greenfield, MA. This covered bridge was all but destroyed by flooding during Hurricane Irene. This road is one of many leading to the hills of Western, MA. (photo credit google images/charlie kellogg)

 

Clydes's Cider Mill
Clyde’s Cider Mill located in Stonington, CT. Sept 1st brings the opening of the Cider Mill. Little known gem- just to the left and down toward the back entrance of the basement is a whiskey/cider distillery. They allow you to sample and purchase half and full gallons. A great hot toddy for September evenings on the porch in New England.  (photo credit/westerly sun)

 

Sandy
Misquamicut Beach Westerly, RI. Among the most southern portions of New England. It’s difficult to explain to people how Hurricane Sandy created the ocean to rise and swallow the beach front property. The ocean redeposited the sand dunes onto Atlantic Avenue. The hurricane literally changed the face of the beach.(photo credit Bill Van Siclen/ProvidenceJournal)

 

Appalachian Trail
100 mile wilderness, Appalachian Trail, Maine. So..you’d like to hike the 100 mile wilderness? This is truly Up-Maine and is strikingly beautiful- The Gateway to the North. A warning though is this: some who hike the 100 mile wilderness are never seen again. (photo credit youtube/will wood)

 

Thank you for reading and Cheers!

I invite you to learn about my self published book.

https://mtaggartwriter.wordpress.com/my-book/

Or read the reviews via the amazon link below.

https://www.amazon.com/Dont-Be-Sally-Based-Events-ebook/dp/B00DYAJ2ZW?ie=UTF8&keywords=don%27t%20be%20a%20sally&qid=1433349895&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1

About the author: When asked where he is from, Matt has replied, ‘I’m from mud.’ Matt grew up in the farmlands of Western, MA. He’s lived in numerous locations within New England. -Read on. It’s good for the brain.

New England – More Than a Region

New England bands culture with devotion. Where the four seasons are to be experienced and enjoyed, not endured. -M. Taggart

IMG_0044 (1)
Kennebunkport, Maine. Bush Senior’s estate overlooks the ocean. Kennebunkport is a beautiful sea side town. Visit the shops or brew pubs and enjoy the views.
Waiting
Watch Hill, Westerly RI. Fog helps to set the mood. The child will not see whom he is waiting for again.
Maine Snow
Shapleigh, Maine. A man climbs a snow bank during a snowstorm (2014). The region had been hit by several snow storms. People in Maine are known for enjoying all four seasons. Apparently night time snow bank climbing counts.
brimfield-tornado.jpg
Brimfield, MA. The 2011 tornado badly damaged this New England town. Visit Brimfield’s massive antique show.  You can view the tornado damage and help the town by having lunch or staying the night. Here’s where to find info http://www.brimfieldshow.com
Emily-Dickinson-Homestead.jpg
Amherst, MA. If you enjoy poetry, visit the Emily Dickinson house then visit downtown Amherst. It’s not a large town, but it’s just big enough to make an afternoon out of it. And if you’re researching colleges, there are five within minutes of one another.
Maple Syrup.jpg
Maple syrup lines, New Hampshire. (source: Flickr user glass_house)
Wine Country
Jonathan Edwards Winery. North Stonington, CT.  Take a drive into the hills of Connecticut, you won’t be disappointed.
Lobster Maine
Perry Long’s Lobster Shack, Surry, Maine. Find more info here http://www.mainetravelmaven.com/my-favorite-maine-lobster-shacks/
block
Block Island, RI. Go here. Just, GO, Here. Take the quick ferry ride and find this beach.

New England consists of six states. Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Click the link below if you’d like to read a short story which takes place in the valley-farmlands of Western MA.

https://mtaggartwriter.wordpress.com/my-book/

Cheers! -M. Taggart

The Exaggerator – Odd Walking Thoughts

He walked farther into the Forrest with his son. He wanted to tell of the tree with the face. He could’t find it. As they searched he told the boy of how the tree must have uprooted itself and moved on because it was alive enough to have a face and speak and could certainly move about the woods as it pleased.  The boy listened and took notice of the tone his mother had warned of. It took on a note of story telling and mistrust grew from each story.  His father crossed a brook then hurried up a slight ravine and happened upon an eleven. See son, these two fallen branches make an eleven and they are showing us the way to the tree face. These were put here as a marker for you and I. There’s no way for them to simply be. They are for us, his father said with great seriousness. His son looked at the Forrest floor wearing a look if sadness. What’s wrong, his father asked. The boy replied, do you ever want to tell and not describe? What do you mean, his father pressed.  That’s maybe not an eleven put here for us, the boy replied. No? He looked at his son with an irritable glance.  Then what is it?  His son answered, two sticks not laying down.

 

 

Our Sick Tree – Odd Walking Thoughts

We were wandering our woods, passed the ravine, and near the big river than home. We came upon a tree that was sick.  Its bark was pealing and we wanted to help.  We kicked the bark with our boots.  The pealing bark flew into bushes and ferns.  We kicked around the base of the tree and started to kick higher to remove all the bark that we could. The frog approached and promptly asked, ‘What are you doing?’ We replied, ‘We’re helping this tree.’  The frog said, ‘Clearly you are not. Can’t you see?  All you are doing is kicking this tree.’

Our Path – Odd Walking Thoughts

There’s a path in back of the old school. We ran to it and slammed into the wood-line and then further. You laughed first and I held mine back. The woods slept while watching. We weren’t sure to leave or stay and then decided to ask a rock. We asked, ‘Would we be alright to stay?’ the rock said nothing. We jumped over the brook and leveled the ferns.