Words are dead

A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
I say it just
Begins to live
That day.

-Emily Dickinson. Final Harvest, (1212).

Thoughts? Is a word ever dead? I think not. Besides that, notice the capitals. Ignore rules and write how it is.

Cheers,

Matt

 

Papa

‘The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.’ -Hemingway

For years I sat alone at night. I read Hemingway. His words helped. I turns out I wasn’t alone after all.

 

A Moveable Feast – The Restored Edition

‘When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagement, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.’ -Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast.

It matters not which end of the spectrum–  early Hemingway, later Hemingway; I always find his words to be exacting and important to me.

I’m reading the ‘Restored Edition’ of The Moveable Feast.  Hemingway wasn’t finished writing this story when he died.  It turns out a chapter was added that he hadn’t written and the first published version contained that chapter and edits that ought not to have been made.  Sean Hemingway, Papa’s grandson, obtained a copy of the original manuscript and again published the work in the proper format.  This edition contains a personal foreword by Patrick Hemingway, the sole surviving son of Papa.

Read on, it’s good for the Brain. -M. Taggart

EH 2723P  Milan, 1918 Ernest Hemingway, American Red Cross volunteer. Portrait by Ermeni Studios, Milan, Italy. Please credit "Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston".
EH 2723P Milan, 1918
Ernest Hemingway, American Red Cross volunteer. Portrait by Ermeni Studios, Milan, Italy. Please credit “Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston”.