A cold, sweet, thing.

Kindness isn’t something hard to remember.

It was cold on the lake.
All the children wore layers and thick hats,
the kind that make it hard to really see them,
and when a flag sprung, everyone said,
“Flag!” And pointed.

The layered children ran toward the flag.
Ice fishing in Maine has a way of making
children, and all people, stay outside.

Two fish were freezing to death in the snow.
They had been brought topside a few minutes earlier.
“Are they dead?” He asked. A curious four-year-old.

“Not yet. But soon.”

“Why are they dead?”

“Because they are freezing and belong in the water.”

“But, why are they dead?”

“Because we caught them and brought them up here.”

“Can I touch them?”

“Yes.”

“Hi, fish. Hi, fish.”
The boy stroked the dying fish with his gloved hand.

-M. Taggart

Cut the negative out of your life, and thrive.

“I’ve read his writing. It’s not very good.”

This statement was made, concerning my writing, by a very toxic individual whom we’ve invited out of our lives as of last year. When told by a mutual friend that I have been published, again, and that I have a book signing at the end of the month, the above, was stated.

These are the kind of games narcissists play. They know the remark will be delivered.

However, I’m terrific at tearing narcissists apart. They fear me. The remark, an attempt to knock my achievements, is empty, hollow. As the saying goes, ‘Live well, and you’ll find success,’ I’ll certainly continue to do just that. I have a blessed life, with an unbreakable faith. I hope they find joy and feel no pain.

Here, was the ending of my post.

But in a serendipitous moment of time, it went on. With Karma leading the charge. Blaine’s comment literally came moments after I wrote the above.

“Thanks, Matt! I’ll have to take you up on that offer. 😃 You’ll have to pardon my sense of humor. You know how to word those situations in life where, something happens, then we’re looking around to see if anybody else just saw the same thing? Because, if I’m doing a double-take, then surely another eyewitness must be, too. 😉 I’m glad I found you and wordpress. Nice to find out a few others, did in fact, see what I saw. LOL” Blaine Thompson.

Blaine goes on-

“Your best friend said it best. It’s no wonder why your writing resonates with so many readers. I don’t know how many times I’ve read one of your entries and immediately a specific life experience appeared in my memory. And, there’s no way I could have found the words to paint the same picture myself. It’s awesome when the writing itself is superb, but it’s even better when it has some Socratic kind of punch behind it. Glad you share with all of us what comes from your pen.” Blaine Thompson

“I can’t wait to read what you have coming up. Whatever it is, we will all benefit. You’re doing a lot more than just sharing the aesthetics of words with all of us. You’re inspiring us all, too. I hope we can return the favor to you by reading and responding.” Blaine Thompson.

Please visit Blaine. His timing is real.

https://thebluegnat.com/

Matt

I don’t know how, Blaine, but you were tuned in. Cheers.

 

Odd Walking Thoughts – between

No, I’m fine, just don’t be like how I was today. The boy looked in the pool of water he’d been stepping in. He lifted his boot from the water and watched the rings form and push outwards, “No! Outward!” His father slammed the door. The boy smashed hit boot into the ringlets with no face. A space fell between them all.

-M. Taggart

Confusion with a tail #poem

Stray dog came at me today.
I didn’t want to fight,
Pulled out my knife-
saw the Pitbull.
Didn’t have much time,
as our four-year-old
was about to be dropped
off from the bus.
What the hell was this dog
doing here, on the side
of a mountain in Maine?
I want to be his friend.
But had to take out
the knife.
Shouldn’t show your teeth.
And shouldn’t circle behind.

-M. Taggart

He’s fine, somewhere in the woods.
I’d like to know him on different terms.
Maybe I’ll find him tomorrow.

Lucky Life #poem

I remember hitting the tree.
My motorcycle slammed along
the pavement as I flew.
“Mom’s going to be so mad.”
I landed on the back of
my right shoulder and head.
My helmet saved my life.
My sweatshirt saved my skin.
The wind was knocked out of me
as my body skipped along the road.
I thought for sure I would taste blood,
something must have ruptured.
As I struggled to remove my helmet,
a woman who witnessed the accident,
pleaded with me to leave my helmet on.
I had to take it off. Something was in my mouth.
I wanted it out. It didn’t take long to realize
my right arm didn’t work, and my right knee
wasn’t functioning. It took a few more days
to learn I had broken my tailbone. Too much swelling
had hid the break from the doctors.
The right side of my body shut down and I was bedridden.
They said three months of possible
bedtime and limited movement. I was up and hobbling around
with a crutch in roughly two weeks. Surgery and all.
I might not have been thinking when I was irresponsible
enough to hit a tree at 90 MPH, but I wasn’t about to let one
of my best failures get in the way of the rest of my life.

-M. Taggart